After Castro’s Death — Grief or Relief?

When you heard the news of Fidel Castro’s death, did you feel relief or grief?

For many on the island nation, the news ushered in a state of mourning for their longtime leader.teal-thespian-faces-tealashes

For Cuban expatriates in the United States and other countries, however, in  some quarters the news ushered in celebrations at most, relief at least.

My first, widowed thought was, How sad for his family and friends who mourn him.  My second thought was, How deeply relieved his opponents and enemies must be.

Because of Fidel, many in Cuba lost their livelihood, home, country, family members, friends, and lives. Were it possible to have tried him for human rights crimes committed against his own countrymen, many I know would have signed up for jury duty.

And yet … that aged dictator’s demise cannot undo the years of separation (by sea and borders if not by death) through which those injured families have grieved.

November 26, one of my friends wrote on his personal Facebook wall (and gave me permission to quote):

Fidel Castro.

A frail old man died. No joy in that. As a Cuban who grew up listening to stories from my father about how Castro rounded up many of my dad’s friends and had them lined up in a firing squad, I am thankful for the end of this dark chapter in the history of my country and pray for better days ahead for the Cuban people.  — Manuel Fernandez*, author of the Wolf Battle series and other books

“Pray for better days ahead.” That’s good advice in the aftermath of every death — not just of public officials but of private citizens too.

Like Manuel, I hope and pray healing and reunion will step in where exile forced out.

___

*I’ve known Manuel and his family for more than twenty years — long before my youngest, now-adult child gave theirs an unauthorized haircut. 

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